Spring comes to Madrid

Spring is lurching its way through the Northern Hemisphere.  In Madrid this year this means more rain than has fallen since the 1940s, usually in a soft drizzle, occasionally spiced with small hail, bouts of hard rain, and periods of epic cloudscapes accompanied by bright sun.  It is familiar weather, reminding me of the part of California I grew up in.

In the countryside the effects of all this water are obvious, the land turns green.  This is likely to be a good year for farmers and wildflowers, though the former have a globally recognized habit of finding something to complain about no matter the weather.  For the wild plants this may mean bountiful seeds next year and the possibility of mast fruiting for woody plants that do that sort of thing (oak trees, I’m looking at you).

Within the boundaries of Madrid, where I have been living recently, the setting is considerably more urban.

The early evening view from a Madrid apartment

The early evening view from a Madrid apartment

In this landscape of stone, cement, and brick the effects of spring are more subtle and easy to overlook; they are most clearly seen in the length and material of coats worn by pedestrians.  Long black wool overcoats are being replaced by short black wool overcoats, leather jackets are replacing down, and on the few warmer days some of the women wear skirts with tights and accompanied by peculiar choices in footwear.

Nature-wise the heralds of spring are the street trees which are beginning to leaf out (especially the elms); ornamental cherries, plums, and almonds have been blooming, and, most interestingly to me, the little plants that have adapted to city life are beginning to show signs of life.

Leaves of an elm seedling

Leaves of an elm seedling

On the patio there is a planter box that has been left to what wild nature resides in the city.  A small elm has taken root and shows nice bonsai potential.  Accompanying the elm are, moss, English Ivy (planted), a few tender oxalis plants, and a small climbing vine with miniscule, but lovely, flowers; purple and white, kissed with egg-yolk yellow.

Leaves and flowers of our mystery plant - the flowers are perhaps half a centimeter across and at most a centimeter long

Leaves and flowers of our mystery plant – the flowers are perhaps half a centimeter across and at most a centimeter long

This plant starts out in a tight cluster and flowers prolifically when conditions are right.

A tangled clump of Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)

A tangled clump of Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)

This little plant, Ivy-leaved Toadfax (Cymbalaria muralis) is evergreen and originally native to the Mediterranean region, now found nearly globally, having been introduced both intentionally and inadvertently. The flowers betray the family association; snapdragons or Scrophulariaceae.

Cymbalaria muralis does not suffer from a lack of names, Coliseum-Ivy , Kenilworth-Ivy, Wandering-Sailor, Mother-Of-Thousands, Oxford-Ivy, Pennywort, and Ivy-leaved Toadflax being just a few of its common names.

Ivy-leaved Toadflax prefers calcareous soils and often grows directly from cliffs and older walls.  Here in Spain it is a native plant and is as much in balance with its environment as any other plant is in a land so heavily used by humans for so long as the Iberian Peninsula has been.  Elsewhere this small plant becomes aggressively invasive and can rapidly form a dense blanket of vegetation over trees, cliffs, and buildings.  It is a popular plant for rock gardens.

If a plant could be described as being clever, this plant might qualify for the compliment.  It sends runners out in all directions, with most of the ones I have seen pointing upwards.

Ivy-Leaved Toadflax climbing a trellis

Ivy-Leaved Toadflax climbing a trellis

On a healthy plant these runners can be nearly a meter long and have a fleshy, almost succulent aspect.  The leaves and the vines are slightly waxy and smooth to the touch, helping to limit water loss.  As it grows, Ivy-leaved Toadflax builds up a dense, nearly light impenetrable, layer of overlapping leaves.  Like a forest, this little clump of shade helps to trap both moisture and organic matter.  This little reservoir of nutrients feeds the ever growing plant.

The most interesting aspect of this plant is its behavior when it flowers and sets seed.  The flowers are pollinated primarily by bees and must be placed where the bees can find and land on them.  To ensure this the young flowerbuds are positively phototrophic; they actively seek out the brightest light.

Cymbalaria muralis flowers growing towards the light

Cymbalaria muralis flowers growing towards the light

Bees can see into the ultraviolet and to them flowers look very different than to us.  I am very curious how these flowers look to the bees.

Once the flower has been pollinated a change takes place and the forming seedpods become negatively phototrophic actively avoiding light.  The change can be quite dramatic and rapid

A fertilized bud running from the light

A fertilized bud moving away from the light

Avoidance of light sends the forming seeds into the darkest places within reach, places where it is more likely to find a safe, damp spot for the small seeds to be deposited.

Light and dark seeking stems

Light and dark seeking stems

This clever approach to seed distribution combined with rooting from runners and re-rooting from broken clumps serve the Ivy-leaved Toadflax well.  This change in light preference is not unique to Ivy-leaved Toadflax, the common houseplant Monstera deliciosa (aka Swiss Cheese Plant, Window Leaf, Mexican Breafdruit, and many more names) begins life avoiding light, then, when it finds a tree trunk its preference turns towards light as it climbs to the near canopy.

We don’t often talk about the behavior of plants, we usually use more neutral terms such as survival strategy.  To us plants are fixed in the landscape with their changes slow.  Plants lack of a brain makes discussion of behavior problematic.  We often fail to have an appreciation for the senses plants posses and they way their response to stimulus drives their growth and adaptability.  We have a prejudice for organisms with a central nervous system, or at least some form of mobility, because they are more similar to ourselves and we find them easier to empathize with.

The little Cymbalaria muralis is far from the only plant in flower right now in Madrid.  In the parks Common Fumitory (aka. Earth Smoke), Fumaria officinalis, is blooming.

Common Fumitory, Earth Smoke (Fumaria officinalis) flowers

Common Fumitory, Earth Smoke (Fumaria officinalis) flowers

Common Fumitory is in the Bleeding Heart family, related to Corydalis, Bleeding Hearts, and Squirrel Corn.  Often this pretty little plant is lumped into a sub-family of the Poppy family (Papaveraceae).

In some places small fields of Red Campion (Silene dioica) dance in the breeze, making rippling patches of purple-tinged pink.

Red Campion (Silene dioica)

Red Campion (Silene dioica)

In the countryside ground dwelling orchids are beginning to bloom, but I have not seen those yet.

Perhaps soon.

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Segovia: sandstones and granite

I have always loved things made of stone, especially ancient constructions.  The stone-masonry I have done has only increased my respect for the strength, vision, and talent of past masons.

Vermont garden wall

Small garden wall of Panton Shale for a friend in Vermont

Most of my stone projects have been small in scale.  The largest project was a 180 foot long retaining wall standing between 2 and 6 feet high, using 30 or 40 tons of stone.  That seems large when you’re doing it by yourself, but that’s a tiny project, barely larger than the little garden wall in the photo above.

In Peru there were some truly astounding pieces of megalithic engineering, many of them little known like Lanche and Kuelap, others well known like Saqsaywaman.

Walls at Saqsaywaman.  For scale zoom into the center of the full-size image to see the person.

Walls at Saqsaywaman. For scale zoom into the center of the full-size image to see the person.

Two days ago I went to the small Spanish city of Segovia and got to see several astounding pieces of stone-based architecture.  The first of these is the ancient Roman aqueduct.

The aqueduct in Segovia

The aqueduct in Segovia

The aqueduct runs about 15 km from the mountains into Segovia, with a 683 meter long raised section running through town.  The tall double arch of granite blocks is impressive enough by modern standards, even more so when you consider that it was built in the 1st or 2nd century, that the granite had to be carried in from the mountains, and that it is a dry-laid structure (no morter holding the blocks together) that has been standing for 1800 or 1900 years.  Clearly, this is a place with few earthquakes.

Granite is a favorite building material for many people.  It is an igneous rock that bubbles up in volcanic flows and cools in place.  The size of the crystals in the rock give an estimation of how long it took for the rock to cool and how much water there was in the melt.  The colors tell of the mineral content.  This granite is pale, with moderately large crystals weathering out, leaving the exposed stone extremely rough to the touch.

Due to the way it forms granite has no preferential cleavage plane, meaning that, given the right tools, it is easy to shape into whatever form is needed.  It is a dense and strong rock as well, another reason it is often used as a foundational material.

The blocks of stone making up the aqueduct are large, not enormous, but large, hundreds of pounds each.  At its highest point the aqueduct is 29 meters tall (that’s about as tall as a 4 or 5 story building).  Nearly 2 thousand years ago those blocks had to be hoisted up and set in place.  Clues as to how the Romans did so are carved into the blocks.

Lifting divots on the granite blocks

Lifting divots on the granite blocks

Each block was lifted into place with a pair of metal pincers, like those people used to carry ice-blocks with.  Divots were carved into the stone to prevent the pincers from losing their grip.  Presumably the divots were carved at the balance point of the block as well, a calculation I would be very curious to know how was done.

Supposedly Segovia was a “small outpost” when the Romans ran things in the area, though the effort and cost of building the aqueduct makes me question that assessment.  Small outpost or no, very little happened in the area for a long while, then in the 1200s the town began to grow and with that growth came the buildings that Europe is so well known for.

Castles and Cathedrals.  Segovia has impressive examples of both, the castle being the inspiration for Walt Disney’s version of Sleeping Beauty, and the cathedral being on the of the last of built of the great Gothic cathedrals.

Segovia cathedral

Segovia cathedral

Construction of the cathedral began in the 1500s, but took more than a century to complete.  The massive building looms over the city, glowing golden in the sunlight.

The first thing that struck me was neither the size nor the the tremendous amount of fine detail.  It was the color.  A warm, yellow/orange, not the color one associates with Gothic architecture, or with goths in general.  The castle, cathedral, and much of the rest of Segovia is made from this stone, not from the granite the aqueduct is made from.

The town of Segovia rests upon an outcrop of calcareous sandstone (sandstone with the grains cemented together by calcium rather than silica) and the land around rises and falls, exposing the bedrock in numerous small cliffs.  Sandstone is a sedimentary rock, a class of rock at the opposite end of the formation spectrum as granites and other igneous rocks.

Sandstone tends to have horizontal cleavage planes, refection the initial depositional patterns, and is often soft and easy to carve.  The sandstone in Segovia seems made for carving and the cathedral  builders took full advantage of this.

Cathedral detail carved from sandstone

Cathedral detail carved from sandstone

Sandstone weathers and erodes easily, especially in the presence of water.  Segovia, despite being a dry region by my standards (about a half meter of rain per year) is considered a wet place in comparison with nearby areas.  As such the builders took pains to protect the soft sandstone, making their waterspout gargoyles of the more resistant granite.

Cathedral gargoyle rain-spout

Cathedral gargoyle rain-spout

Statues of sandstone have not weathered as well as those of granite.

A royal lion slowly weathering away

A royal lion slowly weathering away

The the level of fine detail in the cathedral architecture is reflected elsewhere in the town.  The older buildings and the castle are covered with patterned façades.  In the past these patterns seem to have indicated which family owned the building and in a few cases older patterns could be seen under the more recent ones.

Old wall pattern, the material looks and feels like reconstituted sandstone.

Old wall pattern, the material looks and feels like reconstituted sandstone.

The castle, the Alcázar de Segovia, has a more simple pattern, but each intersection is studded with fragments of volcanic rock.

Looking up the castle wall to the battlements.  the small black studs are fig sized pieces of vesicular volcanic rock brought in from far away.

Looking up the castle wall to the battlements. the small black studs are fig sized pieces of vesicular volcanic rock brought in from far away.

Like many European castles the one at Segovia has gone through a number of iterations; fort, castle, palace, prison, artillery college, and museum.  It still serves the latter two roles.

The castle commands a wonderful view of the countryside in all directions.  One of the most magnificent views is of the cathedral:

Segovia cathedral from atop the Alcázar de Segovia battlements

Segovia cathedral from atop the Alcázar de Segovia battlements

In the opposite direction an old Templar keep and the sandstone cliffs much of the stone was quarried from to make the city are visible.

Templar keep and sandstone cliffs above the river below the castle

Templar keep and sandstone cliffs above the river below the castle

This has been a less science based post than most, but the trip to Segovia was far too interesting to keep all to myself.

The castle, aqueduct, and cathedral are the largest of the attractions, but not the only ones by far.  The food is delicious, mockingbirds flit about the city, interesting small plants grow from the old walls and on the red tile roofs, and great architecture abounds.

Small church in Segovia

Small church in Segovia

Travel Time Again! (remember to say “Yes”)

The trickster gods have been in good moods recently.  Life has been full of interesting surprises, unforeseen opportunities, and things that keep a smile on my face.  The frustration of having my visas delayed for my new job has opened a whole world of opportunities that wouldn’t have been there if the visas had gone smoothly.

A pack of coyotes (Canis latrans) came by to visit for the holidays.

A pack of coyotes (Canis latrans) came by to visit for the holidays.  A blue-eyed one stayed to watch me, perhaps it knew something I didn’t yet know.

Tomorrow, early, much earlier than is comfortable, I head to Spain as a result of several of these unexpected and delightful opportunities.  There I get to mix work with play, experience a new place, and get to know new friends.  From there I head to Indonesia for my new job.

Common ravens (Corvus corax) flying about.  Six of them played on the wind over my head last week for a few minutes before winging off over the mountains,

Common ravens (Corvus corax) flying about. Six of them played on the wind over my head last week for a few minutes before winging off over the mountains,

The visas still are not sorted, but it’s time to move, to see new things, to say, “Yes,” to what is in front of me.

Last time I moved to Asia I flew off into the sunset, heading east, out over the wide Pacific.

This time I chase the sunrise, seeking to lift the curtain of dawn and catch a glimpse of what’s behind it.

My last day in Vermont started with a fabulous rainbow.  It seemed a good omen for the next phase of life.

Rainbow over Hogback Ridge, Vermont on my last day there.

Rainbow over Hogback Ridge, Vermont on my last day there.

I wish you all the best opportunities in the new year and in life with both the wisdom and courage to leap for them when they appear.

If I can, I will post from Spain, otherwise my next post will be from Indonesia.